A Trip to Taipei

 

Summer in Japan is a great time for festivals and fun, as noted in my last entry, but it’s also a great time to get away from Japan. Students in Japan don’t have quite the same summer break as we do in the states, but there is definitely more time off over the summer than at other times of year. Sadly this time off is mostly just for students, not teachers, but with a bit of creative scheduling I was able to plan a trip to Taiwan with my frequent travel buddy, Annin.

Statues in front of the station
Statues in front of Taipei Main Station

Taiwan is a place I’ve had on my “must-visit” list for quite a while now. An island off the coast of China, Taiwan has a complicated history and lots of fascinating culture. To seriously oversimplify, Before WWII Japan occupied Taiwan and used it as a Japanese colony, and after WWII it was “returned” to the Republic of China (ROC). Then, when the communist party ousted the ROC a faction of nationalists, known as the Kuomintang, fled China and took over Taiwan, using it as the base for the ROC, which they claimed was the true/rightful government of China. What followed was, as I said, a very complicated and often bloody history. Today Taiwan maintains a tenuous relationship with China, one I cannot even begin to explain because I don’t entirely understand it myself. There are also remnants of Japanese occupation all over the place, and I remarked many times that Taipei felt a bit like a grittier version of Tokyo. And to be clear, I view that as a positive thing. Japan is awesome, easy to live in, and very safe, but I’ve found that I miss the hustle of a place like Can Tho. There’s an energy to a place that’s still growing and developing, and Japan sometimes lacks this, in my opinion.

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Taiwan is known for delicious food, but I’m not so sure about this place…

In any event, Taiwan has seen a serious boost in tourism in recent years, and it’s developed a bit of a name for itself among those who are interested in traveling within Asia. The food scene is legendary, and while the capital city of Taipei is certainly just as urban as Osaka or Singapore, the surrounding area remains far less crowded, with gorgeous coastline rock formations and tons of hiking trails.

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Ximending at night

With all of this in mind I set off to meet Annin in Taipei. Upon arrival it was clear that Taipei would not be so difficult to navigate – signage in the airport was clear, people were super friendly, and transportation was easily accessible. I took a bus to the center of town,  bought myself an MRT pass, and made my way to the hostel. We chose to stay in Ximending, a shopping district which seems to be the center of youth culture in Taipei. There were hundreds of shops blaring music and blasting air conditioning into the hot summer streets, and the area was hopping well into the night. Coming from my sleepy little town in Japan, I was both surprised and thrilled to find myself once again in such an urban setting. Looking back on the trip I’m not sure I’d choose to stay in Ximending again, but the proximity to the subway and low price of the hostel were both pretty nice for a short trip.

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In front of the National Palace Museum

On our first full day in Taipei it was a bit overcast, so we decided to check out the National Palace Museum. This museum holds the largest collection of Chinese art in the world, and is probably one of the most visited places in Taipei for tourists. Despite the weather and summer travel season, we lucked out and it wasn’t too crowded. The museum’s collections are really amazing, though we somehow missed the two most famous pieces. Regardless, we both walked away feeling much more cultured, and also ravenously hungry. We decided to try for one of the city’s most famous dishes – xiaolong bao, or soup dumplings.

The restaurant we tried to go to initially, the original din tai fung, had a 40 minute wait, which we weren’t quite up for. So we walked around the corner and found another highly-recommended restaurant around the corner, where we were seated immediately. The food was delicious! We ate xiaolong bao, steamed pork buns, seasonal veggies, and shumai. All of it was amazing, and I was in heaven.

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A mural on the side of a bubble tea shop that caught my eye

After our super filling lunch we decided to stay in the city and find the Chiang Kai Shek Memorial. We wandered for quite a while circling a university because Google Maps said it was somewhere inside. After almost half an hour of this we realized that the building on the map was not in fact the famous memorial, but the Chiang Kai Shek Memorial Gymnasium. No wonder the students were giving us strange looks…. Moral of the story is, don’t trust Google Maps abroad.

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Delicious tea and scones at Smith&Hsu

Anyway, after failing to find the memorial we instead made our way towards Taipei 101, which at one point was the tallest building in the world.  On our way we happened upon a fancy tea shop called Smith & Hsu, where we had the most amazing tea and scones. It was a much-needed pick-me-up after our memorial search, and we were both super happy to get a break from the heat. I had read about the shop on Lady Iron Chef, one of my favorite sources for food recommendations in Asia (I have yet to be disappointed by any of their recommendations). The atmosphere was sleek and modern, and the tea selection was really impressive!

After our tea break we walked in and around Taipei 101, though we decided against a trip to the top. It’s a pretty pricey elevator ticket, and we both felt that we’d visited enough tall towers to have a good idea of what we would see. Far more interesting to me was the Eslite bookstore around the corner, which had a larger selection of English language books than I’d seen anywhere else in Asia. Somehow I was able to limit myself to a single collection of Ray Bradbury short stories (probably because I was doing this trip carry-on only), but it was tough. Honestly, the store was so nice I wouldn’t hesitate to call it a highlight of the trip!

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Selfies are a struggle. But hey, look – Taipei 101!

By the time we finished up at Taipei 101 it was time for another meal, and so we hopped on the subway and went to Yong Kang for some street food. We had the most amazing scallion pancakes at a tiny shop with a line around the block. They were super simple, but possibly the best thing I ate in Taipei. Part of that might have been due to the setting. We bought our food at the stall and sat in a nearby park to eat, which is something I did a lot in Vietnam, but which is seen as a bit strange in Japan (unless you’re at a festival). I had really missed the laid back feeling of hanging out in a park at night, eating cheap street food and just people watching.

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Delicious scallion pancakes

 

And finally it was time to head for home, but not before a drink! It turns out there’s a really cool bar in Ximending that only sells Taiwanese beer. I think it’s owned by some expats, but the sheer number of locally made beers was really impressive. There were lots of interesting options, and they were nice enough to give recommendations, since I know almost nothing about beer. So we settled in for a drink and watched a bit of Olympic archery (which was far more interesting than I anticipated).

All in all it was a solid start to the trip, and I’ll tell you all about the rest of our time in Taiwan next week.

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Locally brewed beers at The 58 Bar
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